Zinn Weekend

Zinn Weekend
November 30, 2018 admin
In Uncategorized

Biz Tips:

  • Only fools think they are the best. The humble know they can do better and then proceed to do so. Great business leaders are humble.
  • When you awake today don’t just try to be better; be better. Make your business better every day. Steady progress wins.
  • If as an employer or supervisor, you do not get along with a particular employee and have tried to improve the relationship, get rid of them. The same is also true as an employee you don’t get along with your boss and have tried to resolve the issue, best find another job. Hoping things will resolve themselves is wishful thinking.
  • Some business thinkers advise you to “just say ‘no’” if you don’t agree with a request. Their thinking is that you can get too encumbered with issues that might not be as important as your core ones, and that would derail your efforts.  This can be a “double edge sword”. It could cause you to decline a request that might aggravate relationship issues, and that could come back to bite you.  Telling someone “no” is a very powerful statement and as long as the request is reasonable (not compromising), consider your position very carefully before you decide to take a default “no” position.
  • Wanting to be an entrepreneur and becoming a successful entrepreneur requires a great deal of discipline. Discipline is defined as “doing what you don’t like doing and doing it well”. Sounds easy but it is not. You have to be willing to do the Tough Things First. Eat that ugly frog first every day. Just smear it with ketchup and go to it.
  • When hiring a new employee, make two lists. The first should be the absolute “must have” requirements. The second should be what you want if you could have it your way. If the applicant does not have the first requirement, no need to proceed to the second.

Musings:

Respect for others has to be taught in the home. The reason some cultures, like the Japanese are more respectful is that respect is not only a national culture it is emphasized and reemphasized in the home.

If we are to ever hope to have a respectful culture in the US, we must each start by setting a respectful example even if those around us don’t. Let’s all commit, starting today, to be a more respectful people.


Ministering and administering are two words that sound similar but are very different.

“Ministering” is the loving care for others. “Administering” is the supervision or managing of a task or function. The trick is to combine the two to get the best results.

If we can supervise or manage in a loving, caring way, just think how wonderful our workplaces, home, and communities would be.


When all else fails, read the instructions.” This saying has bugged me forever. Why do we try to do things without understanding the task? Is it that we are stubborn or lazy? Maybe both?

At Micrel, a company I ran for 37 years, we had a very detailed policy and procedures manual. The purpose for these was to insure compliance, uniformity, and consistency across the company. Yet, I found that some employees neither read nor followed the procedures even though we tried to make the procedures simple, short, and logical.

Of course, we didn’t discover the fact that an employee was not following the procedures until we had a problem. Even if the employees had read the P&Ps at one time, there was no guarantee that they would remember what they read.

For important policies and procedures, it is necessary to have them read and re-read regularly, perhaps every few months. If company policies and procedures are important, you must ensure that the pertinent employees know, understand, and follow them or else they will be deemed worthless.

Start by keeping your policies and procedures short, easy to understand, and to the point.


When the founding fathers passed the first amendment, “freedom of speech”, did it mean that we can say or do things intended to harm or incite others to do harm? The answer is obvious, “no”.

Yet there are some that have extrapolated this to mean the opposite.

So why are we letting them get away with this? The answer is, because the definition of “harm” means to injure (physically or damage to their reputation). Being obnoxious, extremely unpleasant, is not specifically causing physical harm but can cause emotional injury.

Legal definitions asie, there is no “cause” important enough to justify obnoxious behavior. It is a crude and unkind person who resorts to obnoxious behavior to get their point across. Where do you stand?


Fact checking” is the process of validating the authenticity of certain information. We all do this irrespective of how we get the information.

But there are people who in effect say, “don’t confuse me with the facts since my mind is made up already”.

Unfortunately, we can all fall into this trap with just a smidgeon of bias. We just want to believe that our story is accurate even if it isn’t. It is our bias that determines whether or not something is factual.

So how should we treat all information? Hopefully, we will do our own fact checking before accepting new information as authentic. First, we should consider the information source and its bias. Second, we should look at multiple sources to insure we hear as many sides as possible. Third, we should analyze the information and determine, in our own minds, if what we are hearing makes any sense. Fourth, make sure our heart is right and not judgmental.

A soft and kind heart will usually get us to the right answers. This is an important part of being a good and rational fact checker.


Humans have insatiable appetites. The more they get the more they want.

Wanting more and more drives us to be greedy. Controlling this greed is the challenge. Cutting back is next to impossible. It is more difficult than losing weight. Should we even consider controlling this appetite for wanting more? It is good for the economy.

So is there value in controlling greed? I say, yes.

To have a good balance in our lives, we need to exercise control. As they say “moderation in all things”. This involves sharing our excess with those who are less fortunate. Be a cheerful and generous giver this holiday season.


The two most important things that will help us deal with tragic circumstances are patience and time. Patience because it helps us to stay optimistic and time because it heals all wounds.

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